ACP2015


Conference Theme: “Power”

March 26–29, 2015 | Osaka International Conference Center, Osaka, Japan

Power in its various forms, hard and soft, political, social, military, economic, and cultural, legitimate and illegitimate, can be defined as the ability to influence or even to control people’s thoughts, attitudes and behavior. As such it is at the core of human relations at all levels, from intra-personal to societal and the global. Appropriate or legitimate use of power can lead to remarkable achievement and success. Abuse of power however is the cause of a wide range of societal problems ranging from domestic violence to war. Social psychologists also refer to the power of the situation as a critical but often underestimated factor in human behavior. Systemic or structural relations have inherent power relations, and these are often more influential factors than personal power relations in human behavior.

By focusing on power we can raise awareness of its pervasiveness and transform our thinking about human relations and social and global problems. It also raises awareness of related issues of vulnerability, and human strengths such as resistance and resilience. Awareness and exploration of these issues can result ultimately in the empowerment of individuals, allowing them to resist or change the existing power relations in their lives.

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Conference Report

ACP2015 was a joint interdisciplinary event with ACERP2015 that enabled 270 delegates to engage in an exciting programme. The programme addressed the central aim of the conference theme in a variety of ways – through the presentation of conference papers that drew upon solid empirical research and developed theoretical and conceptual insights, and also through synergetic networking opportunities across a variety of research approaches.

The ACP2015 Organising Committee was thrilled to welcome such a strong international line-up of Keynote and Featured Speakers, including Professor Mimi Bong of Brain and Motivation Research Institute (bMRI) at Korea University, Professor Satoru Nishizawa of Yamanashi Prefectural University,Professor James McNally, Director of the NACDA Programme on Aging, University of Michigan, and Professor Thomas Brian Mooney of Charles Darwin University. All were inspiring in their commitment to world-class research and the outstanding and informative ways in which they presented their latest projects.

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Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Mimi Bong
Korea University, South Korea

Mimi Bong is Professor of Educational Psychology and the Associate Director of the Brain and Motivation Research Institute (bMRI) of Korea University. Bong has been studying motivation of adolescents in school settings and published over 60 articles and book chapters on related topics over the past 18 years. Her work appears in journals such as Journal of Educational Psychology, Educational Psychologist, Educational Psychology Review, and Contemporary Educational Psychology, among others.

Bong was recognized as the 8th most productive educational psychologist for the period of 1997-2001 and received the ‘Richard E. Snow Award for Early Contributions in Educational Psychology’ from the American Psychological Association/Division 15. She is the Associate Editor of American Educational Research Journal for the Teaching, Learning, and Human Development section and has served or currently serves on the editorial boards of Child Development, Contemporary Educational Psychology, Educational Psychologist, Educational Psychology Review, Educational Researcher, Journal of Educational Psychology, Journal of Experimental Education, and Theory into Practice.


Context-Specific Motivational Beliefs – The Critical Determinants of Adolescent Learning and Self-Regulation

In this presentation, I will argue for the importance of context-specific motivational beliefs in the self-regulation and academic performance of adolescent learners. Whereas the importance of context-specific motivation in academic learning and performance is well established in the literature, the ways with which these diverse motivational beliefs complement or interact with each other to facilitate or hinder self-regulation and achievement remain less clear. I will briefly describe how “context” is typically defined in educational and psychological research and then introduce representative constructs such as interest, self-efficacy, and achievement goals, whose context-specificity has been clearly demonstrated. Results from several empirical studies will then follow, which show that these constructs do interact with each other within specific contexts to produce different learning outcomes as well as mediate the effects of stable personality dispositions and contextual variations on students’ learning processes and outcomes.

Satoru Nishizawa
Yamanashi Prefectural University, Japan

Professor Nishizawa is a Clinical Psychologist and Professor of Social Work at Yamanashi Prefectural University. He is a Chief Editor of the Japanese Journal of Child and Neglect, and a Board Member of several groups, including the Japanese Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, the Center for Child Abuse Prevention, Tokyo, and the Association for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect, Osaka. He is also Professional Advisor for the Department of Family and Child Services, Tokyo Prefectural Government. He has published several books on Child Abuse, the most recent of which is Challenge for Child Abuse: Toward an integrative approach, published (in Japanese) in 2013. He was educated at Osaka University in Japan and San Francisco State University in the US.


Trauma and Attachment Focused Psychotherapy with Maltreated Children

Abused and/or neglected children often show trauma and attachment related psychological and behavioral problems. They need help to recover from traumatic experiences and rebuild healthy attachment to their non-abusive caregivers. The Center for Child Abuse Prevention in Tokyo has provided trauma and attachment-focused psychotherapy for more than 80 maltreated children who are placed at residential facilities, foster homes, and adoptive families since 2005.

This therapy has some characteristics such as implementation of trauma exposure to children in co-joint sessions with their caregivers who provide “holding environment” and encourage children to confront their traumatic experiences. The hypothesis underlying this way of therapy is, the existence of caregivers would facilitate trauma exposure to children, which, in turn, would improve their attachment to caregivers who help them to expose their traumatic events such as abuse.

Many children showed post traumatic play, life story work, and care-related play in the course of the playtherapy. In this presentation, I will discuss the meanings of this play and effectiveness of trauma and attachment focused therapy with maltreated children. Also, I will refer to the therapeutic meanings of “regression” which has been observed in many children in the course of the treatment. Regression might have very important functions for the recovery form trauma and rebuilding appropriate attachment although it has been almost ignored in the Western literatures.

Learning objectives:

1. Learning the techniques of trauma exposure for children.
2. Understanding the way to facilitate children’s attachment toward their caregivers.
3. Reconsidering therapeutic meanings of regression in psychotherapy.


Featured Speakers

James McNally
University of Michigan, USA

James McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialized application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.


The Effects of Family Support on Depression Among Disabled Asian Elders in the United States

This analysis seeks to expand our understanding of ethnic variation in life satisfaction among elderly a household members who face a disabling condition that negatively impacts their health, particularly in regards to the US Asian context. With the introduction of oversampling among Asian households in the National Health Interview Survey we have a unique opportunity to look at ethnic differences in depression responses to health as well as examine the impact that household structure may moderate this outcome among disabled elders. This presentation will look at the risk of severe depression adults among Asian and non-Asian households dependent upon the respondents level of overall health and their access to family support as measured by household structure. We argue that the presence of immediate family support with the household should have a moderating impact on the risk of depression but that the presumed level of social acceptance of co-residence measured by ethnic variation should also result in measurable differences based upon household composition. As “filial responsibility” is often one of the characteristics ascribed to Asian cultures in the US as a component of the model minority stereotype this study seeks to add to a growing literature that looks at this stereotype using research that reflects actual variation within Asian families in relation to other racial groups within the US. Controlling for key variables including the health of the family members, age and race we measure ethnic variations in depression health among the elder household residents across various households compositions.

Dexter Da Silva
Keisen University, Japan

Dr Dexter Da Silva is currently Professor of Educational Psychology at Keisen University in Tokyo. He has taught EFL at junior high school, language schools, and universities in Sydney, and for the past two decades has been living and teaching at the tertiary level in Japan. Professor Da Silva was educated at the University of Sydney (BA, Dip. Ed., M.A.), and the University of Western Sydney (PhD) He has presented and co-presented at conferences in Asia, Australia, Europe and the U.S., and written or co-written articles and book chapters on education-related topics, such as trust, student motivation, autonomy, and content-based language teaching. He is a past editor and current associate editor of On CUE Journal, regular reviewer for conferences and proceedings, and recent co-chair of the 2011 CUE Conference on Motivation.

Jiro Takai
Nagoya University, Japan

Dr Jiro Takai is professor of social psychology at Nagoya University, and received his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has served in the executive committees of the Japan Society for Social Psychology, the Japan Group Dynamics Society, the Japan Intercultural Education Society, the Communication Association of Japan, and the Japan-US Communication Association (affiliate of National Communication Association). Although he was born in Japan, he spent 15 years as a youth growing up in Canada, and has also spent two years living in the United States. Because of such a background, he has an interest in cross-cultural matters, particularly in the context of interpersonal communication as well as research interests in interpersonal competence, self-presentation and Multi-faceted self concept.


Spotlight Speakers

Monty P. Satiadarma
Tarumanagara University, Indonesia

Dr Satiadarma is a clinical psychologist who has been teaching psychology at Tarumanagara University since 1994. He was one of the founders of the Department of Psychology at Tarumanagara, as well as the Dean of Psychology, Vice Rector and Rector of the university. He graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Indonesia, art therapy from Emporia State, Kansas, family counselling from Notre Dame de Namur, California, and clinical hypnotherapy from Irvine, California. He is the co-chair of IAFOR’s Asian Conference on Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences and has nationally published a number of books. Dr Satiadarma has a particular interest in educational psychology, and in music and art therapy, methods with which he treated survivors of the Indonesian tsunami on behalf of the International Red Cross and the United Nations. He is a board member and area chair of the International Council of Psychology, and a founder and board member of the Asian Psychology Association.


The Lucifer Effect in Indonesian Educational Settings

Educators are supposed to transform knowledge and become models to their students. The word educator comes from educo (Latin) and they lead students to conduct behavior in accordance to their suggestions. In a number of ways teachers, educators, and leaders become the authorities to their students. In both formative childhood learning and transformative adult learning (Mezirow, 2003), people seek agreement and justifications based on interpersonal relations, doctrines and ideologies. Milgram’s experiments (1963, 1974) explained in detail how people tend to obey authorities. Bandura (1977) in social learning theory has also explained how people imitate the behavior of their models. When leaders transform inappropriate knowledge and perform inappropriate behaviors, students will tend to imitate them in a form of obedience for being justified in accordance to the authorities. Zimbardo (1971), through his concept of the Lucifer Effect, explained how good people turn to becoming evil because of the environmental forces, the situational attribution, where people internalized their roles given by the authorities. Numbers of Indonesian educational concerns reported issues of charlatanism and hucksterisms (Pope & Vasquez, 1991) are being implemented along with the enforcement by the authorities. Various misconduct issues in Indonesian recent generation are related to the country’s environmental power to enforce the behavior through modelling, obedience and social justifications. To reconstruct the mentality of the people may have to take years and decades. Educators primarily must initiate to take action on improving the behavior of the people in the society in order to avoid more Lucifer Effects in the future.

Minoru Karasawa
Nagoya University, Japan

Minoru Karasawa received his Master’s degree from Kyoto University, Japan, and PhD from the University of California, USA, both majoring in psychology. After teaching at Aichi Gakuin University and Kobe University, he has been at Nagoya University since 2006. Dr Karasawa’s primary research area has been social cognition, covering various issues such as social categorization, intergroup cognition and emotions, and the role of culture and language in social inferences. He is also heading a research project on the psychological mechanism underlying judgments of responsibility and punitive motives in legal contexts. He has been an Associate Editor of the Asian Journal of Social Psychology and the Editor of the Japanese Journal of Social Psychology. Academic associations that he has served as a board member include the Japanese Society of Social Psychology, the Japanese Group Dynamics Association, and the Japanese Society for Law and Psychology. He has been a member of the Science Council of Japan since 2006.

Stuart D. B. Picken
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Stuart D. B. Picken is the founding chairman of the IAFOR International Advisory Board. The author of a dozen books and over 130 articles and papers, he is considered one of the foremost scholars on Japan, China, and Globalization in East Asia. As an academic, Professor Picken has devoted more than 30 years to scholarship in Japan, notably as a professor at the International Christian University in Tokyo, where he specialized in ethics and Japanese thought, and as International Adviser to the High Priest of Tsubaki Grand Shrine (Mie prefecture). He has also served as a consultant to various businesses, including Jun Ashida Ltd., Mitsui Mining & Smelting Corp., Kobe Steel, and Japan Air Lines. In November 2008, the Government of Japan awarded Professor Picken the Order of the Sacred Treasure for his pioneering research, and outstanding contribution to the promotion of friendship and mutual understanding between Japan and the UK. The honour is normally reserved for Japanese citizens and is a mark of the utmost respect in which Professor Picken is held by the Japanese Government. Although now resident in Scotland, Professor Picken maintains his interests in Japan, as Chair of the Japan Society of Scotland, and through his work with IAFOR. A fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, he lives near Glasgow with his wife and two children.

Frank S. Ravitch
Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Frank S. Ravitch is Professor of Law and the Walter H. Stowers Chair in Law and Religion at the Michigan State University College of Law, and Director of the Kyoto, Japan Summer Program. He is the author of several books: Marketing Intelligent Design: Law And The Creationist Agenda (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2011); Masters Of Illusion: The Supreme Court And The Religion Clauses (NYU Press 2007); Law And Religion, A Reader: Cases, Concepts, And Theory, 2nd Ed. (West 2008) (First Ed. 2004); Employment Discrimination Law (Prentice Hall 2005) (with Pamela Sumners and Janis McDonald); and School Prayer And Discrimination: The Civil Rights Of Religious Minorities And Dissenters (Northeastern University Press, 1999 & paperback edition 2001). Professor Ravitch has also published a number of law review articles addressing U.S. and Japanese constitutional law, law & religion, and civil rights law in leading journals. Moreover, he has written a number of amicus briefs addressing constitutional issues to the United States Supreme Court.

In 2001, Professor Ravitch was named a Fulbright Scholar and served on the Faculty of Law at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. Currently, he directs the Michigan State University College of Law Japan Summer program. Professor Ravitch regularly serves as an expert for print and broadcast media, and speaks on topics related to U.S. Constitutional Law, Japanese Law, and Israeli Law to a wide range of national, international and local organizations. He speaks English, Japanese, and Hebrew.

Thomas Brian Mooney
Charles Darwin University, Australia

Thomas Brian Mooney is Professor of Philosophy and Head of School of Creative Arts and Humanities, Charles Darwin University.

His major research interests are in Moral Philosophy, Political Philosophy and Ancient Philosophy, and recent books include Aquinas, Education and the East (2014), Understanding Teaching and Learning (2012), Meaning and Morality: Essays on the Philosophy of Julius Kovesi (2013) and Critical and Creative Thinking (McGraw Hill: Forthcoming 2014).

Originally from the North of Ireland, he completed his BA and MA from The Queen’s University, Belfast before moving to Australia to continue his doctoral work, being awarded his PhD in 1993 on the “Philosophy of Love and Friendship” at La Trobe University. Since then has taught at a number of Australian institutions including Melbourne University, Deakin University, Swinburne University, Edith Cowan University, and the University of Notre Dame. He has also taught at the University of Ghana, and prior to his current post, was at Singapore Management University.


Powers of the Soul – A Very Different Theory of Justice

Contemporary philosophical (as well as political, sociological and psychological) accounts of power focus on the exercise of power within given social conditions. From such perspectives power and its exercise, is largely a matter of external concern – the power of the media, the power of governments, of law, of politics and so on. However, certain writers in the ancient world of the West conceived of power and powers quite differently. They conceived of power as essentially located in virtues of the soul – internal power. While the Greeks were no strangers to the notion of external power (think of Thucydides’ Melian Dialogues) they conceived of such external power as having its sources in the soul of individuals and collectives. In this paper I address some dimensions of the internal nature of power and provide some suggestions as to what a theory of justice might look like starting from this vantage point – a very different theory of justice than those prevalent in the contemporary world.

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Organising Committee

ACP2015

Dexter Da Silva
Keisen University, Japan

Dr Dexter Da Silva is currently Professor of Educational Psychology at Keisen University in Tokyo. He has taught EFL at junior high school, language schools, and universities in Sydney, and for the past two decades has been living and teaching at the tertiary level in Japan. Professor Da Silva was educated at the University of Sydney (BA, Dip. Ed., M.A.), and the University of Western Sydney (PhD) He has presented and co-presented at conferences in Asia, Australia, Europe and the U.S., and written or co-written articles and book chapters on education-related topics, such as trust, student motivation, autonomy, and content-based language teaching. He is a past editor and current associate editor of On CUE Journal, regular reviewer for conferences and proceedings, and recent co-chair of the 2011 CUE Conference on Motivation.

Jiro Takai
Nagoya University, Japan

Dr Jiro Takai is professor of social psychology at Nagoya University, and received his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has served in the executive committees of the Japan Society for Social Psychology, the Japan Group Dynamics Society, the Japan Intercultural Education Society, the Communication Association of Japan, and the Japan-US Communication Association (affiliate of National Communication Association). Although he was born in Japan, he spent 15 years as a youth growing up in Canada, and has also spent two years living in the United States. Because of such a background, he has an interest in cross-cultural matters, particularly in the context of interpersonal communication as well as research interests in interpersonal competence, self-presentation and Multi-faceted self concept.

Monty P. Satiadarma
Tarumanagara University, Indonesia

Dr Satiadarma is a clinical psychologist who has been teaching psychology at Tarumanagara University since 1994. He was one of the founders of the Department of Psychology at Tarumanagara, as well as the Dean of Psychology, Vice Rector and Rector of the university. He graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Indonesia, art therapy from Emporia State, Kansas, family counselling from Notre Dame de Namur, California, and clinical hypnotherapy from Irvine, California. He is the co-chair of IAFOR’s Asian Conference on Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences and has nationally published a number of books. Dr Satiadarma has a particular interest in educational psychology, and in music and art therapy, methods with which he treated survivors of the Indonesian tsunami on behalf of the International Red Cross and the United Nations. He is a board member and area chair of the International Council of Psychology, and a founder and board member of the Asian Psychology Association.

Minoru Karasawa
Nagoya University, Japan

Minoru Karasawa received his Master’s degree from Kyoto University, Japan, and PhD from the University of California, USA, both majoring in psychology. After teaching at Aichi Gakuin University and Kobe University, he has been at Nagoya University since 2006. Dr Karasawa’s primary research area has been social cognition, covering various issues such as social categorization, intergroup cognition and emotions, and the role of culture and language in social inferences. He is also heading a research project on the psychological mechanism underlying judgments of responsibility and punitive motives in legal contexts. He has been an Associate Editor of the Asian Journal of Social Psychology and the Editor of the Japanese Journal of Social Psychology. Academic associations that he has served as a board member include the Japanese Society of Social Psychology, the Japanese Group Dynamics Association, and the Japanese Society for Law and Psychology. He has been a member of the Science Council of Japan since 2006.


ACERP2015

Stuart D. B. Picken
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Stuart D. B. Picken is the founding chairman of the IAFOR International Advisory Board. The author of a dozen books and over 130 articles and papers, he is considered one of the foremost scholars on Japan, China, and Globalization in East Asia. As an academic, Professor Picken has devoted more than 30 years to scholarship in Japan, notably as a professor at the International Christian University in Tokyo, where he specialized in ethics and Japanese thought, and as International Adviser to the High Priest of Tsubaki Grand Shrine (Mie prefecture). He has also served as a consultant to various businesses, including Jun Ashida Ltd., Mitsui Mining & Smelting Corp., Kobe Steel, and Japan Air Lines. In November 2008, the Government of Japan awarded Professor Picken the Order of the Sacred Treasure for his pioneering research, and outstanding contribution to the promotion of friendship and mutual understanding between Japan and the UK. The honour is normally reserved for Japanese citizens and is a mark of the utmost respect in which Professor Picken is held by the Japanese Government. Although now resident in Scotland, Professor Picken maintains his interests in Japan, as Chair of the Japan Society of Scotland, and through his work with IAFOR. A fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society, he lives near Glasgow with his wife and two children.

Frank S. Ravitch
Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Frank S. Ravitch is Professor of Law and the Walter H. Stowers Chair in Law and Religion at the Michigan State University College of Law, and Director of the Kyoto, Japan Summer Program. He is the author of several books: Marketing Intelligent Design: Law And The Creationist Agenda (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2011); Masters Of Illusion: The Supreme Court And The Religion Clauses (NYU Press 2007); Law And Religion, A Reader: Cases, Concepts, And Theory, 2nd Ed. (West 2008) (First Ed. 2004); Employment Discrimination Law (Prentice Hall 2005) (with Pamela Sumners and Janis McDonald); and School Prayer And Discrimination: The Civil Rights Of Religious Minorities And Dissenters (Northeastern University Press, 1999 & paperback edition 2001). Professor Ravitch has also published a number of law review articles addressing U.S. and Japanese constitutional law, law & religion, and civil rights law in leading journals. Moreover, he has written a number of amicus briefs addressing constitutional issues to the United States Supreme Court.

In 2001, Professor Ravitch was named a Fulbright Scholar and served on the Faculty of Law at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. Currently, he directs the Michigan State University College of Law Japan Summer program. Professor Ravitch regularly serves as an expert for print and broadcast media, and speaks on topics related to U.S. Constitutional Law, Japanese Law, and Israeli Law to a wide range of national, international and local organizations. He speaks English, Japanese, and Hebrew.

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Conference Videos

Mimi Bong

Context-Specific Motivational Beliefs – The Critical Determinants of Adolescent Learning and Self-Regulation

In this presentation, Professor Mimi Bong will argue for the importance of context-specific motivational beliefs in the self-regulation and academic performance of adolescent learners.Whereas the importance of context-specific motivation in academic learning and performance is well established in the literature, the ways with which these diverse motivational beliefs complement or interact with each other to facilitate or hinder self-regulation and achievement remain less clear. She will briefly describe how “context” is typically defined in educational and psychological research and then introduce representative constructs such as interest, self-efficacy, and achievement goals, whose context-specificity has been clearly demonstrated. Results from several empirical studies will then follow, which show that these constructs do interact with each other within specific contexts to produce different learning outcomes as well as mediate the effects of stable personality dispositions and contextual variations on students’ learning processes and outcomes.


Frank S. Ravitch

Constitutional Revision in Japan: The Risks for Freedom of Religion and Freedom of Speech

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and some of his political allies have worked hard to begin a process of Constitutional Revision that endangers not only Japan’s post war pacifist legacy, but also the fundamental freedoms of the Japanese people. Much of the attention has focused on Abe’s attempts to amend Article 9, often referred to as the “Pacifist” provision of the Constitution. Many Japanese people and politicians have strongly opposed any change to Article 9, and it is safe to say that Abe vastly underestimated the resolve of the Japanese people on this issue. Yet, like a shell game, while people try to follow the fate of Article 9, other risks are missed. Once the Constitution is open to revision, freedom of speech, which has already reached a postwar low in recent years, and freedom of religion, may be at risk. Professor Ravitch has argued elsewhere that Prime Minister’s visits to the Yasukuni Shrine violate Articles 20 and 89 of the Japanese Constitution, but with Constitutional revision such visits might become ordinary and in fact, it would be possible for the government to fund these shrines to appease nationalists. In the last few years Japan has fallen to 59th in the world for freedom of the speech and the press according to Reporters Without Borders. It is far below every other major democratic country with similar economic status (and many non-democratic nations). With constitutional revision free speech and a free press may be further limited. Shadows of the Meiji Constitution, where personal freedoms were empty promises subsumed to state interests and nationalist fanaticism are rearing their heads. It is not just the risk to the Pacifist provision, which has already been all but ignored by the current administration, but to the Freedom of Speech and Religion that bring those shadows forward. It is up to the Japanese people to protect the freedoms they have come to value and which they have used in ways that benefit the entire world with Japanese creativity and insight.


Interview: Dexter Da Silva & Frank S. Ravitch

In this follow-up interview IAFOR Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP) Conference Co-Chair Professor Dexter Da Silva speaks with Professor Frank S. Ravitch of Michigan State University College of Law and further explores the issues and challenges surrounding the Japanese Constitution and also discusses with Professor Ravitch his increasing involvement with IAFOR and our academic conferences.

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A message from the IAFOR Board of Directors on the impact of COVID-19 on our activities.