ACP2018

The-Asian-Conference-on-Psychology-&-the-Behavioral-Sciences-2018


“Surviving and Thriving in Times of Change”

March 22–24, 2018 | Art Center Kobe, Kobe, Japan

“The only thing that is constant is change.” This is attributed to Heraclitus, 500 years before Christ, but he was not the last person to say this. More recently, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi used the same words to remind us of a basic aspect of the human condition – we need to accept and adapt to change, and cope with the stress that it brings, in order to survive and thrive.

Change is not new, but change today is unique in its pace, its extent and its impact. The pace of change in its various forms – technological change, social change, climate change – has been incredible; its extent has been global. The impact of change on humans has been extremely powerful. Our daily lives have changed dramatically and irreversibly.

One of the challenges of psychology and the behavioral sciences has been to help humans adapt to their environments, to help us be resilient in the face of challenges and failures, to help us maintain our mental health, to help us overcome the various difficulties that life brings us. All areas in the study of psychology and the behavioral sciences aim to teach us to be psychologically literate, to provide us with the knowledge and skills to survive and thrive, and to help others survive and thrive.

Back to Top


ACP2018 Conference Photographs

Human interaction is at the root of all knowledge creation, and hence the great importance of the conference in introducing, testing and spreading ideas through challenging, rigorous and thought provoking discussion and debate. But beyond that, a conference is also a great chance to meet people from around the world, and to extend and grow ones’s professional network, and above all, to make friends.

It may be impossible to tell the story of the conference, or rather the many hundreds of interlocking stories that go to make up the conference, but the documentary photography in this slideshow aims to give a taster of the more serious academic side of the event, as well as the lighter side…

Back to Top


Programme

  • Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century
    Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century
    Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Dexter Da Silva (Panel Chair), Professor Steve Cornwell, Professor Ronald Mellado Miller & Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
  • Patterns of Depression Among Elderly Asian Immigrants to the United States Over the Past Decade
    Patterns of Depression Among Elderly Asian Immigrants to the United States Over the Past Decade
    Featured Presentation: Dr James W. McNally
  • On Being Tolerant and Acceptant to Survive Life Changes
    On Being Tolerant and Acceptant to Survive Life Changes
    Featured Presentation: Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
  • Law, Religion and Authoritarianism: From State Shinto to Religio-Trumpism
    Law, Religion and Authoritarianism: From State Shinto to Religio-Trumpism
    Keynote Presentation: Professor Frank S. Ravitch
  • Shinto: Window on Universal Religion
    Shinto: Window on Universal Religion
    Featured Presentation: Dr Brian Victoria
  • IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening
    IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening
  • IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session
    IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session

Back to Top


Speakers

  • Professor Steve Cornwell
    Professor Steve Cornwell
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan
  • Dr James W. McNally
    Dr James W. McNally
    University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging
  • Professor Ronald Mellado Miller
    Professor Ronald Mellado Miller
    Brigham Young University – Hawaii, USA
  • Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
    Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
    Tarumanagara University, Indonesia
  • Professor Dexter Da Silva
    Professor Dexter Da Silva
    Keisen University, Japan
  • Dr Brian Victoria
    Dr Brian Victoria
    Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, UK
  • Professor Frank S. Ravitch
    Professor Frank S. Ravitch
    Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Back to Top


Organising Committee

The Organising Committee of The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP) is composed of distinguished academics who are experts in their fields. Organising Committee members may also be members of IAFOR's International Academic Advisory Board. The Organising Committee is responsible for nominating and vetting Keynote and Featured Speakers; developing the conference programme, including special workshops, panels, targeted sessions, and so forth; event outreach and promotion; recommending and attracting future Organising Committee members; working with IAFOR to select PhD students and early career academics for IAFOR-funded grants and scholarships; and overseeing the reviewing of abstracts submitted to the conference.

  • Dr Joseph Haldane
    Dr Joseph Haldane
    The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
  • Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
    Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
    Tarumanagara University, Indonesia
  • Professor Dexter Da Silva
    Professor Dexter Da Silva
    Keisen University, Japan
  • Dr Brian Victoria
    Dr Brian Victoria
    Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, UK
  • Professor Frank S. Ravitch
    Professor Frank S. Ravitch
    Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Back to Top


ACP2018 Review Committee

  • Dr Ai Ni Teoh, Heriot-Watt University, Malaysia
  • Dr Elsayed Elkhamisi, Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain
  • Dr Hamer Bastidas-Bilbao, Universidad del Rosario, Colombia
  • Dr Man-Tak Leung, Hong Kong Shue Yan University, Hong Kong
  • Dr Marco Vassallo, Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Italy
  • Mischelle Flormata, University of Santo Tomas, The Philippines
  • Dr Miyako Kimura, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Japan
  • Dr Prapaporn Manorath, Boromarajonani College of Nursing in Uttaradit, Thailand
  • Dr Ryan Dale Elnar, University of Mindanao, The Philippines
  • Dr Ume Kalsoom, Shaheed Benazir Bhutto Women University, Pakistan
  • Dr Yoshihiko Yamamoto, Shizuoka University, Japan

IAFOR's peer review process, which involves both reciprocal review and the use of Review Committees, is overseen by conference Organising Committee members under the guidance of the Academic Governing Board. Review Committee members are established academics who hold PhDs or other terminal degrees in their fields and who have previous peer review experience.

If you would like to apply to serve on the ACP Review Committee, please visit our application page.

Back to Top


ACP2018 Grant & Scholarship Recipients

Our warmest congratulations go to Marcella L. Sintos, Ellie Taylor, Mercede Erfanian and Preeti Khanna, who have been selected by the conference Organising Committees to receive grants and scholarships to present their research at The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences 2018.

IAFOR’s grants and scholarships programme provides financial support to PhD students and early career academics, with the aim of helping them pursue research excellence and achieve their academic goals through interdisciplinary study and interaction. Awards are based on the appropriateness of the educational opportunity in relation to the applicant’s field of study, financial need, and contributions to their community and to IAFOR’s mission of interdisciplinarity. Scholarships are awarded based on availability of funds from IAFOR and vary with each conference.

The Organising Committee of the relevant IAFOR conference awards scholarships to eligible applicants who have submitted exceptional abstracts that have passed the blind peer review process and have been accepted for presentation at the conference.

Marcella L. SintosEllie Karen TaylorMercede ErfanianPreeti Khanna

Stuart D. B. Picken Grant & Scholarship Recipient

Marcella L. Sintos is a newly registered psychologist in the Philippines. She finished her graduate studies in Clinical Psychology at De La Salle University-Manila, and is currently working as a research assistant in De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde for approximately three years. Her research interests focus on the field of Deaf Education and development of assessment tools for Deaf students.

Psychological Distress of Filipino Deaf: Role of Environmental Vulnerabilities, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Social Support
Marcella L. Sintos, De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, The Philippines

Studies on deaf mental health exemplify that they are two to three times more vulnerable to psychological distress not because of their deafness per se, but because of their interactions in the hearing world. Throughout their lifespan, they have been exposed to several vulnerabilities such as hearing parents, communication barriers, additional disabilities, and lack of mental health services. Using the assumptions of stress-vulnerability-protective factors model of Liberman (2008), moderation analyses were performed to prove the buffering role of general self-efficacy and perceived social support on the effect of vulnerabilities in their psychological distress. 120 self-contained deaf college students aged 18 to 25 (M=21.83; SD=4.11) participated in the study. Results show that (1) vulnerabilities do not influence psychological distress, (2) general self-efficacy and perceived social support do not act as buffers, and (3) perceived social support directly affects psychological distress. These entail inapplicability of the framework among the deaf population, which may be attributed to their learned resilience from the vulnerabilities they are exposed to since birth. However, the increased vulnerability of deaf individuals compared to the hearing population hinders them from becoming fully resilient because it negatively affects their perception of themselves and others. To aid in reducing their psychological distress while at the same time increasing their resilience, this study recommends provision of external support such as competent clinicians in the field of deaf culture and mental health, and specific programs crafted for deaf individuals to develop their life skills. Limitations of the study were also discussed.

IAFOR Scholarship Recipient

Ellie Taylor was educated at the University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia, and graduated with a Bachelor of Psychology (first class honours), and Masters by Research, majoring in psychology. Ellie is currently undertaking a Doctor of Philosophy, and for the past 4 years, has worked as a Research Officer for the Global Challenges Program at the University of Wollongong. Ellie’s earlier research endeavours focused on attention-deficits and impulsivity in child and adolescent populations. Ellie has since worked with the New South Wales State Emergency Service, examining resilience and post-traumatic growth among emergency service personnel. Currently, her research at the University of Wollongong explores how people with severe mental illness can live well, for longer, through initiatives that foster self-determination and growth. Ellie's research privileges the position and voice of those with lived experience of mental illness.

Surviving and Thriving: The Interplay Between Self-Determination and Personal Recovery Among People Living with Severe Mental Illness
Ellie Karen Taylor, University of Wollongong, Australia
Lorna Moxham, University of Wollongong, Australia
Dana Perlman, University of Wollongong, Australia
Christopher Patterson, University of Wollongong, Australia
Renee Brighton, University of Wollongong, Australia

Personal recovery is a goal for many people who live with severe and enduring mental illness (consumers). Yet, in the face of significant marginalisation and stigma, how can they survive and thrive? Self-determination has arisen as an area of importance in this regard. Those with greater self-determination tend to participate in self-motivated behaviours that promote quality of life and increase wellbeing. However, despite shared theoretical underpinnings, no research to date has specifically looked at Self-Determination Theory and personal recovery concurrently. This is imperative given that mental health care is shifting toward a recovery-oriented approach across many regions of the globe. Participation in therapeutic recreation activities appears promising in increasing self-determination among consumers. This presentation will explore a novel approach to consumer well-being, termed Recovery Camp. Developed in Australia, this five-day therapeutic recreation program is an ongoing initiative where consumers are invited to engage in positive risk-taking and choice. At Recovery Camp, participants partake in team pursuits and ‘daredevil’ activities designed to challenge and remediate. The experience fosters the development of self-determination through the promotion of personal responsibility and self-management. Using a 3-phase sequential mixed methods approach, this research addresses a significant gap in the literature by exploring the interplay between self-determination and personal recovery in the context of Recovery Camp. Survey, interview and focus group data, gathered over 2 years, will be utilised to discuss how consumers can survive and thrive amongst the difficulties life brings. Practical, multidisciplinary implications for mental health professionals, educators, and researchers will be discussed.

IAFOR Scholarship Recipient

Mercede Erfanian is a neuroscientist with a particular focus on affective disorders. Her research concerns understanding brain mechanisms in patients with mood and anxiety disorders. At the moment her research is fully focused on Misophonia, its brain mechanism, cognitive and emotional characteristics, and co-morbidity with other affective disorders. She has published several scientific papers and is the winner of many European and international prizes (e.g. Herman Westenberg) and grants (e.g. IBRO-FENS).”

Synesthesia in Bipolar and Schizophrenic Patients: A Study of Its Relationship with Abstract Thinking

Mercede Erfanian, Maastricht University, Netherlands

The neurological condition ‘synesthesia’ may explain the links underlying metaphor perception and comprehension of abstract concepts in humans. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders share certain similarities regarding symptomology which often inhibits and attenuates differentiating between them. A unique characteristic of schizophrenics’ thought and language disturbance is concretism. In other words, schizophrenic patients fail to understand metaphors. On the other hand, an intellectual ability such as metaphor perception remains intact in bipolar patients. The current study determines if schizophrenic patients are weaker at metaphor comprehension than bipolar and normal individuals, if the schizophrenics are weaker in synesthesia comprehension than bipolar and normal individuals, if bipolar patients can understand metaphors as well as healthy people, and whether bipolar patients can understand synesthesia as well as healthy controls. Twenty-eight schizophrenic patients, 28 patients with bipolar disorder, and 28 healthy controls were analysed in two subgroups of male and female participants, who completed Synesthesia battery and a designed metaphor task. The results of battery and the task in schizophrenic patients were significantly lower, in comparison with bipolar patients’ (p<0.01). The responses to the metaphor task were more literally comprehended in the schizophrenic group as compared with the bipolar and control groups. No significant differences were observed in the results between the healthy control and bipolar group tasks. The results revealed a strong correlation between synesthesia and metaphor recognition which could stem from coexisting common neurological structures. Thus, synesthesia may determine a causal role in the ability to develop understanding abstract concepts and abstract thinking.

IAFOR Scholarship Recipient

Preeti Khanna is a Senior Research Fellow - Food & Nutrition (PhD Scholar) at Institute of Home Economics, University of Delhi, India. Currently, she is working on the impact of depression and anxiety on food intake among adolescents. She is very passionate about nutrition research and plans to join the Indian health ministry.

Depression, Anxiety & Eating Disorders: Prevalence & Association Among Adolescents Studying in Public Schools of Delhi
Preeti Khanna, Institute of Home Economics, University of Delhi, India
Bani Aeri, Institute of Home Economics, University of Delhi, India

Data on the prevalence of mental health disorders indicates that 4.5% and 3% of the Indian population is suffering from depression and anxiety respectively. Depression is ranked by WHO (2015) as the single largest contributor to global disability, therefore there is a need to investigate the maturation patterns (gender specific) & its relationship with psychosocial & nutritional factors which impact the overall health of an adolescent. The present research was designed to study the prevalence & association of depression & anxiety with eating disorders & BMI among adolescent boys & girls (13-15 years) studying in public schools of Delhi. 300 adolescents participated in this cross-sectional study. For the assessment of depression and anxiety & eating disorders Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; administered to the parents) and Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ; administered to the subjects) were used respectively. Data were also collected on socio-demographic profile, physical activity, dietary practices & consumption pattern, food intake (24hr recall, Food Frequency Questionnaire), body image perception, locus of control & anthropometric (Weight, Height, BMI, Body fat %) profiles. Prevalence of depression & anxiety is 37.5% and eating disorders (restrained, uncontrolled & emotional) is 18%. Anthropometric data revealed that 18.3%, 7% and 20% of the subjects are underweight, overweight and obese respectively. 58% of the malnourished subjects are suffering from depression & anxiety. This study highlights the association of mental health with eating disorders & nutritional status of adolescents. It will also serve as a strategic tool for mental health prevention & management policies designed for adolescents.

Back to Top

Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century
Featured Panel Presentation: Professor Dexter Da Silva (Panel Chair), Professor Steve Cornwell, Professor Ronald Mellado Miller & Dr Monty P. Satiadarma

Psychological literacy is the ability to apply psychological principles to personal, professional and societal issues. It includes, amongst the nine factors identified with it: 1) having a well-defined vocabulary and basic knowledge of psychology; 2) valuing scientific thinking; and 3) taking a creative approach to problem-solving. I have come to agree with those who consider it to be the most important literacy of the 21st century. The technological, social, geopolitical and other changes facing humans today enable and force us to make decisions and choices, to be more trustworthy and to have to trust more and more people who have more and more influence on important aspects of our lives. Understanding our communities and our world, our relationships, and ourselves, understanding what we can control or change and how we can control or change them for the benefit of ourselves and those in our communities and in our care is the most important and powerful tool for this millennium.

Read presenter biographies.

Patterns of Depression Among Elderly Asian Immigrants to the United States Over the Past Decade
Featured Presentation: Dr James W. McNally

Immigrants in the United States often face increased stressors associated with the transitions from an established home to a new environment. Factors such as cultural displacement, language barriers, economic and employment concerns, immigration status and safe housing can all contribute to fears that can manifest themselves in depression or anxiety. These risks can be further intensified when the individual is elderly, and their health, socioeconomic status and social support networks within the United States are weakened. This paper will use ten years of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to examine change in reported rates of depression or social anxiety among the elderly Asian population. The paper will compare immigrant elders to native born Asian elders and control for duration in the United States, sociodemographic characteristics, and health factors to isolate the impacts of immigration on mental health outcomes. The presence of social support networks, access to care, and level of disability will also be examined as part of the analysis. The paper argues that two factors play into the emotional uncertainty that can result in depression and or social anxiety. We argue that recent immigrants are more vulnerable to mental health challenges compared to US born due to increased levels of social displacement. We also argue that this risk can be attenuated among elderly immigrants by the presence of social support networks measured by contact with family or other individuals with a similar background.

Read presenter biographies.

On Being Tolerant and Acceptant to Survive Life Changes
Featured Presentation: Dr Monty P. Satiadarma

Every person needs to adjust to life changes in order to survive. Changes may create conflict. Conflict is the arousal of two strong motives within a person and can not be solved together. Festinger (1957) concluded that conflicting situation created discomfort leading to dissonance. In field theory, Lewin (1935) had previously mentioned that in various conditions people had to deal with multiple approach-avoidance conflict. In modern society such conflicting situations remain, and people are being challenged to change their behaviours, attitudes, and sometimes their beliefs in order to get adjusted and survive to live in the society. Tolerance (Fish, 2014) and acceptance (Fish, 2014; Taylor, 2013) are two key aspects people need to use to deal with such conditions. However, the process of being tolerant and ability to accept conditions is enduring and often needs painstaking efforts. This paper discusses the challenges on being tolerant and acceptant toward conflicting situations for people to remain survive in dealing with life changes.

Read presenter biographies.

Law, Religion and Authoritarianism: From State Shinto to Religio-Trumpism
Keynote Presentation: Professor Frank S. Ravitch

In recent years authoritarianism has become an increasing threat to democratic institutions, human rights, and the rule of law. Authoritarian regimes have taken hold throughout the world. One of the most troubling trends has been the rise of authoritarian movements, leaders, and policies buoyed by populist politicians in longstanding democracies such as the United States. This has occurred at the same time as authoritarian regimes in Russia and Turkey have increased their holds on power.

Law has proven an inadequate tool to stem this tide and in some cases has been used to reinforce authoritarian agendas. Moreover, even in democratic countries constitutional structures have sometimes proven inadequate to prevent authoritarian actors from inflicting significant harm to human rights and the rule of law. To protect against the damage that is being inflicted we must first understand the dynamics underlying authoritarianism and dispel some myths that may confuse policymakers and social justice advocates as they work to stem the tide.

One such myth involves the relationship between religion and authoritarianism. This talk will address that myth, which confuses the relationship between authoritarianism and religion by assuming that religion is a driving force for authoritarian leaders and especially for many of their followers and acolytes. Certainly religion is an especially powerful tool in the hands of authoritarians, but without that tool authoritarians and their followers will, and have, found other tools to use.

A better understanding of the real relationship between religion and authoritarianism (where religion is a tool rather than a cause of authoritarianism) can be explored by studying two seemingly different situations: the role and use of State Shinto in Meiji, Taisho, and early Showa periods in Japan and the use of religious culture war issues and religio-patriotism by Trump and his followers in the U.S. today. Eerily, these two seemingly different situations have significant commonalities.

Read presenter biographies.

Shinto: Window on Universal Religion
Featured Presentation: Dr Brian Victoria

To claim that Shinto is in some way connected with “universal religion” would appear to be an oxymoron. As explained in any guidebook on Japan, Shinto is the indigenous religion of the Japanese people, and only the Japanese people. By comparison with the five great world religions, i.e. Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and Hinduism, Shinto appears to an exclusively ethnic religion.

At the same time, it is important to recall that everyone alive today is a homo sapiens, a human species with a history of at least 200,000 years and likely longer. Nevertheless, the five major world religions have, at most, a history of only 5,000 years. Even older religions, such as those of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Indo-Europeans, add perhaps another five thousand years to our knowledge of religious history. Thus, we currently have some idea of the spiritual life of homo sapiens dating back, at most, 10,000 years. This means we currently understand only about 5% or less of our collective religious history, or in other words, we are largely ignorant of 95% of the spiritual life of our species.

The thesis of this paper is that what existed prior to known or historic religions, and therefore the oldest form of religious belief, is today called “animism.” Animism is a religion (or, more accurately, a series of closely related religions) once prevalent throughout the entire world and can therefore be rightfully identified as the universal religion of all homo sapiens. Inasmuch as Shinto is today one of the most vibrant forms of animism still in existence, it can serve as a window to that time when animism was the universal religion of humankind. This paper explores not only Shinto’s ritual and mythological content but also the impact that animism, as manifested in Shinto, has had on today’s world religions.

Read presenter biographies.

IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 | Award Winners Screening

The IAFOR Documentary Photography Award was launched by The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) in 2015 as an international photography award that seeks to promote and assist in the professional development of emerging documentary photographers and photojournalists. The award has benefitted since the outset from the expertise of an outstanding panel of internationally renowned photographers, including Dr Paul Lowe as the Founding Judge, and Ed Kashi, Monica Allende, Simon Roberts, Jocelyn Bain Hogg, Simon Norfolk and Emma Bowkett as Guest Judges. Now in its third year, the award has already been widely recognised by those in the industry and has been supported by World Press Photo, Metro Imaging, MediaStorm, Think Tank Photo, University of the Arts London, RMIT University, British Journal of Photography, The Centre for Documentary Practice, and the Medill School of Journalism.

As an organisation, IAFOR’s mission is to promote international exchange, facilitate intercultural awareness, encourage interdisciplinary discussion, and generate and share new knowledge. In keeping with this mission, in appreciation of the great value of photography as a medium that can be shared across borders of language, culture and nation, and to influence and inform our academic work and programmes, the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award was launched as a competition that would help underline the importance of the organisation’s aims, and would promote and recognise best practice and excellence.

Winners of the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 were announced at The European Conference on Media, Communication & Film 2017 (EuroMedia2017) in Brighton, UK. The award follows the theme of the EuroMedia conference, with 2017’s theme being “History, Story, Narrative”. In support of up-and-coming talent, the IAFOR Documentary Photography Award is free to enter.

Access to the Award Winners Screening is included in the conference registration fee. For more information about the award, click here.

Image | From the project Single Mothers of Afghanistan by IAFOR Documentary Photography Award 2017 Grand Prize Winner, Kiana Hayeri.

IAFOR Silk Road Initiative Information Session

As an organization, IAFOR’s mission is to promote international exchange, facilitate intercultural awareness, encourage interdisciplinary discussion, and generate and share new knowledge. In 2018, we are excited to launch a major new and ambitious international, intercultural and interdisciplinary research initiative which uses the silk road trade routes as a lens through which to study some of the world’s largest historical and contemporary geopolitical trends, shifts and exchanges.

IAFOR is headquartered in Japan, and the 2018 inauguration of this project aligns with the 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration of 1868, when Japan opened its doors to the trade and ideas that would precipitate its rapid modernisation and its emergence as a global power. At a time when global trends can seem unpredictable, and futures fearful, the IAFOR Silk Road Initiative gives the opportunity to revisit the question of the impact of international relations from a long-term perspective.

This ambitious initiative will encourage individuals and institutions working across the world to support and undertake research centring on the contact between countries and regions in Europe and Asia – from Gibraltar to Japan – and the maritime routes that went beyond, into the South-East Continent and the Philippines, and later out into the Pacific Islands and the United States. The IAFOR Silk Road Initiative will be concerned with all aspects of this contact, and will examine both material and intellectual traces, as well as consequences.

For more information about the IAFOR Silk Road Initiative, click here.

Professor Steve Cornwell
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) & Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan

Biography

Steve Cornwell is the President of IAFOR, and President of the Academic Governing Board. He coordinates and oversees the International Academic Advisory Board, and also serves on the organisation's Board of Directors. He is Chair of the Language Learning section of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Dr Cornwell is Vice President of Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan, where he is also a Professor of English and Interdisciplinary Studies. He helped write and design several of the courses at the New School in New York, and currently teaches on the online portion of the MA TESOL Programme, having been involved with the programme since its inception.

He has also been involved with the Japan Association for Language Teaching (JALT) serving on its National Board of Directors as Director of Programme from 2012 to 2016; where his duties involved working with a volunteer team of over 50 people to organise JALT’s annual, international conference each autumn.

Since 2012 he has been the Committee Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s Lifelong Learning Committee and is responsible for their evening extension programme geared towards alumni and community members. He is also the Vice-Chair of Osaka Jogakuin University’s English Education Committee, which is responsible for suggesting policy regarding English education and for developing material for the integrated curriculum.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century
Dr James W. McNally
University of Michigan, USA & NACDA Program on Aging

Biography

Dr James W. McNally is the Director of the NACDA Program on Aging, a data archive containing over 1,500 studies related to health and the aging lifecourse. He currently does methodological research on the improvement and enhancement of secondary research data and has been cited as an expert authority on data imputation. Dr McNally has directed the NACDA Program on Aging since 1998 and has seen the archive significantly increase its holdings with a growing collection of seminal studies on the aging lifecourse, health, retirement and international aspects of aging. He has spent much of his career addressing methodological issues with a specific focus on specialised application of incomplete or deficient data and the enhancement of secondary data for research applications. Dr McNally has also worked extensively on issues related to international aging and changing perspectives on the role of family support in the later stages of the aging lifecourse.

Dr James W. McNally is a Vice-President of IAFOR. He is Chair of the Social Sciences & Sustainability division of the International Academic Advisory Board.

Featured Presentation (2018) | Patterns of Depression Among Elderly Asian Immigrants to the United States Over the Past Decade
Professor Ronald Mellado Miller
Brigham Young University – Hawaii, USA

Biography

Dr Ronald Mellado Miller received his PhD from Purdue University in Experimental Psychology, USA, and is currently a professor at Brigham Young University in Hawaii. Dr Miller’s main interests have been in the area of applied statistical analysis and predictive modelling. As a result, his research and work have been quite eclectic. He has research published in journals ranging from Animal Learning and Behavior, Learning and Motivation, Applied Neuropsychology, TechTrends, and the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, out of Oxford University Press, where he has also served as a reviewer. He has worked for a number of major airlines (Fedex, United, US Airways, etc.) in the area of safety. His international projects have ranged from India and the Philippines, where he was able to assist NGOs established to aid those in poverty, to China, where he worked with the largest entertainment company in the country. He has led research in Tonga, Fiji, and Samoa, working with governments and NGOs to improve educational and other social outcomes. He has a great love for teaching and mentoring. His students have participated in each of his consulting projects and have been accepted to prestigious schools around the world, including Oxford University, MIT, and Columbia University, among others.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | A Poverty of Hope: Towards a Psychology of Humanitarian Success
Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
Tarumanagara University, Indonesia

Biography

Dr Satiadarma is a clinical psychologist who has been teaching psychology at Tarumanagara University since 1994. He was one of the founders of the Department of Psychology at Tarumanagara, as well as the Dean of Psychology, Vice Rector and Rector of the university. He graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Indonesia, art therapy from Emporia State, Kansas, family counselling from Notre Dame de Namur, California, and clinical hypnotherapy from Irvine, California. He has nationally published a number of books with a particular interest in educational psychology, and in music and art therapy – methods with which he treated survivors of the Indonesian tsunami on behalf of the International Red Cross and the United Nations. He is a board member and area chair of the International Council of Psychology, and a founder and board member of the Asian Psychology Association.

Featured Presentation (2018) | On Being Tolerant and Acceptant to Survive Life Changes
Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century

Previous Presentations

IAAB Presentation (2017) | Life Changes, Identity Loss and Psychological Problems
Spotlight Presentation (2016) | Fairness and Happiness
Spotlight Presentation (2015) | The Lucifer Effect in Indonesian Educational Settings
Featured Presentation (2014)
Featured Presentation (2013)
Featured Presentation (2012)
Professor Dexter Da Silva
Keisen University, Japan

Biography

Dr Dexter Da Silva is currently Professor of Educational Psychology at Keisen University in Tokyo. He has taught EFL at junior high school, language schools, and universities in Sydney, Australia, and for more than two decades has been living, and teaching at the tertiary level, in Japan. Professor Da Silva was educated at the University of Sydney (BA, Dip. Ed., MA), and the University of Western Sydney (PhD). He has presented and co-presented at conferences in Asia, Australia, Europe and the United States, co-edited two books on Motivation in Foreign Language Learning, and written or co-written articles and book chapters on education-related topics, such as trust, student motivation, autonomy, and content-based language teaching. He is a past editor of On CUE Journal, past president of the Asian Psychological Association, regular reviewer for conferences, proceedings, journal articles and book chapters, and regularly co-chairs and participates in the Organising Committee of conferences on Motivation, Language Learning and Teaching, and Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Battles of Ideas: Identity and Alienation
Featured Presentation (2015)
Featured Presentation (2014)
Featured Presentation (2012)
Dr Brian Victoria
Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, UK

Biography

Brian Victoria is a native of Omaha, Nebraska and a 1961 graduate of Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln, Nebraska. He holds a MA in Buddhist Studies from Sōtō Zen sect-affiliated Komazawa University in Tokyo, and a PhD from the Department of Religious Studies at Temple University.

In addition to a second, enlarged edition of Zen At War (Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), Brian's major writings include Zen War Stories (RoutledgeCurzon, 2003); an autobiographical work in Japanese entitled Gaijin de ari, Zen bozu de ari (As a Foreigner, As a Zen Priest), published by San-ichi Shobo in 1971; Zen Master Dōgen, coauthored with Prof. Yokoi Yūhō of Aichi-gakuin University (Weatherhill, 1976); and a translation of The Zen Life by Sato Koji (Weatherhill, 1972). In addition, Brian has published numerous journal articles, focusing on the relationship of not only Buddhism but religion in general, to violence and warfare.

From 2005 to 2013 Brian was a Professor of Japanese Studies and director of the AEA “Japan and Its Buddhist Traditions Program” at Antioch University in Yellow Springs, OH, USA. From 2013-2015 he was a Visiting Research Fellow at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies in Kyoto, Japan where he is writing a book tentatively entitled: Zen Terror in 1930s Japan. Brian currently continues his research as a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, and is a fully ordained Buddhist priest in the Sōtō Zen sect.

Featured Presentation (2018) | Shinto: Window on Universal Religion

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Military Conscription, Slavery and the Modern State
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Battles of Ideas: Identity and Alienation
Featured Presentation (2016) | Abstract for Religion and War – The Wartime Tribalization of Universal Religions
Featured Presentation (2016) | Holy War – Its Causes, Nature and, if possible, its Solutions
Spotlight Presentation (2015) | Powers of the Soul – A Very Different Theory of Justice
Professor Frank S. Ravitch
Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Biography

Frank S. Ravitch is Professor of Law and Walter H. Stowers Chair in Law in Religion at the Michigan State University College of Law. He also directs the MSU College of Law, Kyoto Japan Program. He is the author of Freedom’s Edge: Religious Freedom, Sexual Freedom, and the Future of America (Cambridge University Press, 2016) (Nominated for a Prose Award); Marketing Creation: The Law and Intelligent Design (Cambridge University Press 2012), Masters of Illusion: The Supreme Court and the Religion Clauses (NYU Press 2007); Law and Religion: Cases, Materials, and Readings (West 2004)(2nd Ed. 2008) (3rd Ed. 2015 with Larry Cata Backer), School Prayer and Discrimination: The Civil Rights of Religious Minorities and Dissenters (Northeastern University Press, 1999 & paperback edition 2001). He is co-author, with the late Boris Bittker and with Scott Idleman, of the first comprehensive treatise on Law and Religion in more than one hundred years, Religion and the State in American Law (Cambridge University Press 2015) (this project was supported by a generous grant from the Lilly Endowment). He is also co-author of, Employment Discrimination Law (Prentice Hall, 2005) (with Pamela Sumners and Janis McDonald).

Professor Ravitch's articles, which have appeared in a number of highly regarded journals, have primarily focused on law and religion in the US and Japan, but he has also written about civil rights law and disability discrimination. He has authored a number of amicus briefs to the US Supreme Court and has given numerous academic presentations nationally and internationally. In 2001, he was named a Fulbright scholar and served on the law faculty at Doshisha University (Japan). He has also made dozens of public presentations explaining the law before school groups, community groups, and service clubs and has served as an expert commentator for print and broadcast media.

Professor Ravitch’s current projects include a book on the Japanese Legal System (co-authored with Colin Jones), a chapter on law and religious tradition, and a project focusing on Law, Religion, and Authoritarianism. He speaks English and basic conversational Japanese and Hebrew.

Keynote Presentation (2018) | Law, Religion and Authoritarianism: From State Shinto to Religio-Trumpism

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Freedom’s Edge: Balancing Religious Freedom and Equal Access to Facilities and Services for Transexuals
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Free Speech & Hate Speech – History, Story, Narrative
Keynote Presentation (2016) | Freedom’s Edge – Religious Freedom, Sexual Freedom, and the Future of Justice in America
Featured Presentation (2015)
Keynote Presentation (2014)
Dr Joseph Haldane
The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan

Biography

Joseph Haldane is the Chairman and CEO of IAFOR. He is responsible for devising strategy, setting policies, forging institutional partnerships, implementing projects, and overseeing the organisation’s business and academic operations, including research, publications and events.

Dr Haldane holds a PhD from the University of London in 19th-century French Studies, and has had full-time faculty positions at the University of Paris XII Paris-Est Créteil (France), Sciences Po Paris (France), and Nagoya University of Commerce and Business (Japan), as well as visiting positions at the French Press Institute in the University of Paris II Panthéon-Assas (France), The School of Journalism at Sciences Po Paris (France), and the School of Journalism at Moscow State University (Russia).

Dr Haldane’s current research concentrates on post-war and contemporary politics and international affairs, and since 2015 he has been a Guest Professor at The Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) at Osaka University, where he teaches on the postgraduate Global Governance Course, and Co-Director of the OSIPP-IAFOR Research Centre, an interdisciplinary think tank situated within Osaka University.

He is also a Visiting Professor in the Faculty of Philology at the University of Belgrade, a Member of the International Advisory Council of the Department of Educational Foundations at the College of Education of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network for Global Governance.

From 2012 to 2014, Dr Haldane served as Treasurer of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (Chubu Region) and he is currently a Trustee of the HOPE International Development Agency (Japan). He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in 2012, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts in 2015.

A black belt in judo, he is married with two children, and lives in Japan.

Dr Monty P. Satiadarma
Tarumanagara University, Indonesia

Biography

Dr Satiadarma is a clinical psychologist who has been teaching psychology at Tarumanagara University since 1994. He was one of the founders of the Department of Psychology at Tarumanagara, as well as the Dean of Psychology, Vice Rector and Rector of the university. He graduated with a degree in psychology from the University of Indonesia, art therapy from Emporia State, Kansas, family counselling from Notre Dame de Namur, California, and clinical hypnotherapy from Irvine, California. He has nationally published a number of books with a particular interest in educational psychology, and in music and art therapy – methods with which he treated survivors of the Indonesian tsunami on behalf of the International Red Cross and the United Nations. He is a board member and area chair of the International Council of Psychology, and a founder and board member of the Asian Psychology Association.

Featured Presentation (2018) | On Being Tolerant and Acceptant to Survive Life Changes
Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century

Previous Presentations

IAAB Presentation (2017) | Life Changes, Identity Loss and Psychological Problems
Spotlight Presentation (2016) | Fairness and Happiness
Spotlight Presentation (2015) | The Lucifer Effect in Indonesian Educational Settings
Featured Presentation (2014)
Featured Presentation (2013)
Featured Presentation (2012)
Professor Dexter Da Silva
Keisen University, Japan

Biography

Dr Dexter Da Silva is currently Professor of Educational Psychology at Keisen University in Tokyo. He has taught EFL at junior high school, language schools, and universities in Sydney, Australia, and for more than two decades has been living, and teaching at the tertiary level, in Japan. Professor Da Silva was educated at the University of Sydney (BA, Dip. Ed., MA), and the University of Western Sydney (PhD). He has presented and co-presented at conferences in Asia, Australia, Europe and the United States, co-edited two books on Motivation in Foreign Language Learning, and written or co-written articles and book chapters on education-related topics, such as trust, student motivation, autonomy, and content-based language teaching. He is a past editor of On CUE Journal, past president of the Asian Psychological Association, regular reviewer for conferences, proceedings, journal articles and book chapters, and regularly co-chairs and participates in the Organising Committee of conferences on Motivation, Language Learning and Teaching, and Psychology and the Behavioral Sciences.

Featured Panel Presentation (2018) | Psychological Literacy: The Most Important Literacy for the 21st Century

Previous Presentations

Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Battles of Ideas: Identity and Alienation
Featured Presentation (2015)
Featured Presentation (2014)
Featured Presentation (2012)
Dr Brian Victoria
Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, UK

Biography

Brian Victoria is a native of Omaha, Nebraska and a 1961 graduate of Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln, Nebraska. He holds a MA in Buddhist Studies from Sōtō Zen sect-affiliated Komazawa University in Tokyo, and a PhD from the Department of Religious Studies at Temple University.

In addition to a second, enlarged edition of Zen At War (Rowman & Littlefield, 2006), Brian's major writings include Zen War Stories (RoutledgeCurzon, 2003); an autobiographical work in Japanese entitled Gaijin de ari, Zen bozu de ari (As a Foreigner, As a Zen Priest), published by San-ichi Shobo in 1971; Zen Master Dōgen, coauthored with Prof. Yokoi Yūhō of Aichi-gakuin University (Weatherhill, 1976); and a translation of The Zen Life by Sato Koji (Weatherhill, 1972). In addition, Brian has published numerous journal articles, focusing on the relationship of not only Buddhism but religion in general, to violence and warfare.

From 2005 to 2013 Brian was a Professor of Japanese Studies and director of the AEA “Japan and Its Buddhist Traditions Program” at Antioch University in Yellow Springs, OH, USA. From 2013-2015 he was a Visiting Research Fellow at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies in Kyoto, Japan where he is writing a book tentatively entitled: Zen Terror in 1930s Japan. Brian currently continues his research as a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies, and is a fully ordained Buddhist priest in the Sōtō Zen sect.

Featured Presentation (2018) | Shinto: Window on Universal Religion

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Military Conscription, Slavery and the Modern State
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Battles of Ideas: Identity and Alienation
Featured Presentation (2016) | Abstract for Religion and War – The Wartime Tribalization of Universal Religions
Featured Presentation (2016) | Holy War – Its Causes, Nature and, if possible, its Solutions
Spotlight Presentation (2015) | Powers of the Soul – A Very Different Theory of Justice
Professor Frank S. Ravitch
Michigan State University College of Law, USA

Biography

Frank S. Ravitch is Professor of Law and Walter H. Stowers Chair in Law in Religion at the Michigan State University College of Law. He also directs the MSU College of Law, Kyoto Japan Program. He is the author of Freedom’s Edge: Religious Freedom, Sexual Freedom, and the Future of America (Cambridge University Press, 2016) (Nominated for a Prose Award); Marketing Creation: The Law and Intelligent Design (Cambridge University Press 2012), Masters of Illusion: The Supreme Court and the Religion Clauses (NYU Press 2007); Law and Religion: Cases, Materials, and Readings (West 2004)(2nd Ed. 2008) (3rd Ed. 2015 with Larry Cata Backer), School Prayer and Discrimination: The Civil Rights of Religious Minorities and Dissenters (Northeastern University Press, 1999 & paperback edition 2001). He is co-author, with the late Boris Bittker and with Scott Idleman, of the first comprehensive treatise on Law and Religion in more than one hundred years, Religion and the State in American Law (Cambridge University Press 2015) (this project was supported by a generous grant from the Lilly Endowment). He is also co-author of, Employment Discrimination Law (Prentice Hall, 2005) (with Pamela Sumners and Janis McDonald).

Professor Ravitch's articles, which have appeared in a number of highly regarded journals, have primarily focused on law and religion in the US and Japan, but he has also written about civil rights law and disability discrimination. He has authored a number of amicus briefs to the US Supreme Court and has given numerous academic presentations nationally and internationally. In 2001, he was named a Fulbright scholar and served on the law faculty at Doshisha University (Japan). He has also made dozens of public presentations explaining the law before school groups, community groups, and service clubs and has served as an expert commentator for print and broadcast media.

Professor Ravitch’s current projects include a book on the Japanese Legal System (co-authored with Colin Jones), a chapter on law and religious tradition, and a project focusing on Law, Religion, and Authoritarianism. He speaks English and basic conversational Japanese and Hebrew.

Keynote Presentation (2018) | Law, Religion and Authoritarianism: From State Shinto to Religio-Trumpism

Previous Presentations

Featured Presentation (2017) | Freedom’s Edge: Balancing Religious Freedom and Equal Access to Facilities and Services for Transexuals
Featured Panel Presentation (2017) | Free Speech & Hate Speech – History, Story, Narrative
Keynote Presentation (2016) | Freedom’s Edge – Religious Freedom, Sexual Freedom, and the Future of Justice in America
Featured Presentation (2015)
Keynote Presentation (2014)