Programme

The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The Asian Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy (ACERP) as part of “Think Tokyo". Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Tuesday, March 29, 2022Wednesday, March 30, 2022Thursday, March 31, 2022

09:00–12:00: Plenary Session

12:00–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Plenary Session

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Plenary Session

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Closing Session

The above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
    Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
    Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch
  • Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
    Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
    Plenary Panel
  • Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
    Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
    Plenary Panel

Virtual Presentations


Conference Programme

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on February 28, 2022. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

*Please be aware that the above schedule may be subject to change.

Important Information Emails

All registered attendees will receive an Important Information email and updates in the run-up to the conference. Please check your email inbox for something from "iafor.org". If you can not find these emails in your normal inbox, it is worth checking in your spam or junk mail folders as many programs filter out emails this way. If these did end up in one of these folders, please add the address to your acceptable senders' folder by whatever method your email program can do this.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACP conferences via the links below.

Religion and COVID 19 in the U.S.: The Good, the Bad, and the Shocking
Keynote Presentation: Frank S. Ravitch

The responses to COVID-19 by religious individuals and entities in the United States have ranged from being scientifically informed, thoughtful, and balanced to endangering society. Similarly, the responses to religious concerns by government entities in the United States have ranged from scientifically sound while considering the needs of religious communities to pandering to certain religious communities in a manner that endangers society as a whole. Not surprisingly, much of this has coincided with the politicization of COVID in the United States. Thus, while the Jewish, Islamic, Buddhist and other religious communities have generally supported vaccination, masking, and social distancing (including holding services on Zoom), there has been a divide within Christianity. Most Christian denominations support vaccination, masking, and social distancing, but denominations associated more with social conservatism (for example, a large number of white Evangelicals) oppose vaccination, masking and distancing. Meanwhile, the response by state governments to religious vaccine exemptions and religious gatherings has varied from sincere attempts to accommodate religion with no or minimal harm to public health to subverting religion to public health concerns to pandering to conservative religious entities at the expense of public health.

Read presenters' biography
Responding to COVID: Trauma and Recovery
Plenary Panel

The coronavirus pandemic had an enormous impact on the lives of billions of people simultaneously across the globe, disrupting and straining many of the relationships and support structures that are the sinews of society. Lockdowns exacerbated cases of loneliness and isolation, domestic abuse, and suicides, and shutdowns adversely affected huge economic losses. Many elderly died alone, while children lost precious months and years of the education so crucial to the building of lives. Fear and anxiety became prevalent as 2020 and 2021 became years of collective disruption and trauma. We are only just beginning to come to terms with the enormous ramifications of the pandemic and the first collective trauma of the globalised era.

In this plenary panel, a group of experts will look at the damage that has been done, as well as the lessons we might learn as we seek to recover.

Ethical, Religious and Philosophical Dilemmas in Responding to COVID
Plenary Panel

One of the most worrying aspects of the COVID pandemic was the “locking down” of huge swathes of the global population, for the general security of the population, for “their own good”. When China first responded to the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan by incarcerating the whole of the city, it was an effective but shocking response. Many commentators opined that China might be able to do that, but in countries where freedoms of movement and assembly were societal cornerstones, surely that wouldn’t be possible. However, “lockdowns” quickly spread, and the ability of China to control its population through what amounted to mass incarceration was lauded as highly efficient, evidencing the superiority of an autocratic system in times of crisis.

Soon lockdowns were complemented by track and trace technologies that not only allowed, but mandated unprecedented invasions of privacy, justifying enormous data transfer between individuals and the government and private sector contractors.

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A message from the IAFOR Board of Directors on the impact of COVID-19 on our activities.