Programme

The Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences (ACP) is an interdisciplinary conference held alongside The Asian Conference on Ethics, Religion & Philosophy (ACERP) as part of “Think Tokyo". Speakers will provide a variety of perspectives from different academic and professional backgrounds. Registration for either conference will allow participants to attend sessions in both.

This page provides details of featured presentations, the conference schedule and other programming. For more information about presenters, please visit the Speakers page.


Conference Outline

Thursday, March 26, 2020Friday, March 27, 2020Saturday, March 28, 2020Sunday, March 29, 2020

17:00-18:00: Conference Registration

18:00-19:00: Welcome Reception

09:00–12:00: Plenary Session & Conference Photograph

12:00–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Plenary Session

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Plenary Session

16:30–17:30: Conference Poster Session

19:00-21:30: Official Conference Dinner (optional extra)

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Parallel Sessions

09:00–10:30: Parallel Sessions

10:30–10:45: Break

10:45–12:15: Parallel Sessions

12:15–13:15: Lunch Break

13:15–14:45: Parallel Sessions

14:45–15:00: Break

15:00–16:30: Parallel Sessions

16:30–17:00: Break

17:00–18:00: Closing Session

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available online on February 26, 2020. All registered delegates will be notified of this publication by email.

The above schedule may be subject to change.


Featured Presentations

  • Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
    Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
    Featured Presentation: Yu Niiya
  • Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
    Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
    Keynote Presentation: Stephen Gregg

Final Programme

The Conference Programme contains access information, session information and a detailed day-to-day presentation schedule. All registered delegates who attend The 10th Asian Conference on Psychology & the Behavioral Sciences receive a printed copy of the Conference Programme at the Registration Desk on arrival. Only one copy of the Conference Programme is available per delegate, so please take good care of your copy.

The draft version of the Conference Programme will be available on February 26, 2020. The final Conference Programme will be available on March 13, 2020.


Previous Programming

View details of programming for past ACP conferences via the links below.

Helping a stranger in Japan: Who helps and why?
Featured Presentation: Yu Niiya

Renowned for its hospitality, Japan is getting ready for more omotenashi as it prepares for the Olympic and Paralympic games. However, is Japan really a helpful nation? Are the Japanese compassionate people? This presentation provides evidence that, in Japan, the decision to help a stranger depends heavily on what the situation dictates. To avoid the embarrassment of appearing meddlesome, the Japanese are less likely to intervene when the need of help is ambiguous, rather than clear. Further research shows that people who pursue compassionate goals to support others’ well-being are more likely to help, whereas those who pursue the goals to avoid projecting a negative image of the self are less likely to help. These findings suggest that helping could be promoted by encouraging people to shift their focus from questioning “what will I get?” to “what can I give?” Additionally, I will present recent findings that suggest that despite spending more time on others, those with compassionate goals experience greater time affluence and subjective well-being. The more strongly people pursue the goals to support others, the more they offer help and the happier they are.

Read presenters' biography
Embracing Difference: Religious Diversity in the UK
Keynote Presentation: Stephen Gregg

Tolerance for religious diversity is a core message in recent Governmental and Educational initiatives in the United Kingdom, along with a major component of British “soft power” in international relations. This presentation looks beyond the “brand” of multiculturalism/diverse heritage of the modern UK to understand religious identities beyond essentialising and reductive categories of membership or belonging. Using a Lived Religion approach, which preferences people above texts and practices above beliefs, I will survey recent UK equalities legislation, and discuss the effect this has had on everyday lived reality for religious individuals and communities. I will analyse census data and raise issues relating to the rise of the “religious nones”, the muted voices of minority religions, and the debate over Britain as a “Christian country”. I will focus on diversity within, as well as between, religions and ask why some communities are embraced more than others, and reflect upon the problem of tolerating intolerance.

Read presenters' biography